6ixpassions

Some wonder why it takes so long to add a feature. It’s not about the dev work. The hard part is finding a clear design concept.

Rushing seems like a good way to satisfy customers. But if the concept isn’t first class, it will degrade their experience in the long run.

Being responsive to customers includes taking the time to properly consider the problem and arrive at a well-integrated solution.

New features should feel woven into the product. Not like a patch stuck on.

Ryan Singer - Twitter (via 6ixpassions)
explore-blog
I’m not a scientist. Like a lot of journalists, I go out and talk to a lot of people who know much more than I do. And I’m always surprised when they think I’ve got something new to tell them after I’ve published. You’ll talk to a bunch of scientists, you’ll write a story about what they’re doing, and then they’ll invite you to their next meeting as if you have original information. You don’t. What you have is the ability to synthesize and tell a story.

conversation with Michael Pollan, author of the most important food politics book of the past half-century. His most recent tome, Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation, is a must-read. (via explore-blog)

A good analogy for stakeholder interviews.

davereed
davereed:

marketingland:

The Death Of The QR Code

Damn it, and I still don’t own a smart phone. 

I hate things like this. First, the title is a blatant play for pageviews. There is nothing that indicates QR is dead, only that its adoption has been slower than expected: over-hyped or underperforming? You decide. I don’t disagree that adoption isn’t what it could/should be; It’s a chicken/egg problem. QR codes are huge in Japan (I know) largely because they’re everywhere and meaningful.
I’m a fan of SMS for its flexibility and availability, but his other suggestions pose the same — or different and bigger — problems as QR codes: Downloading a huge, inflexible (only compatible with one brand/experience) app? Sure, you need an app for QR codes, but you have loads of apps to choose from and you’re not constrained to Weight Watchers or whatever. While QR codes aren’t widely adopted, they solve the problems this guy calls out better than any of his solutions.
The problem isn’t the codes, per se, it’s the context. Improve the context, improve the outcome (which is also true for his alternative suggestions).

davereed:

marketingland:

The Death Of The QR Code

Damn it, and I still don’t own a smart phone. 

I hate things like this. First, the title is a blatant play for pageviews. There is nothing that indicates QR is dead, only that its adoption has been slower than expected: over-hyped or underperforming? You decide. I don’t disagree that adoption isn’t what it could/should be; It’s a chicken/egg problem. QR codes are huge in Japan (I know) largely because they’re everywhere and meaningful.

I’m a fan of SMS for its flexibility and availability, but his other suggestions pose the same — or different and bigger — problems as QR codes: Downloading a huge, inflexible (only compatible with one brand/experience) app? Sure, you need an app for QR codes, but you have loads of apps to choose from and you’re not constrained to Weight Watchers or whatever. While QR codes aren’t widely adopted, they solve the problems this guy calls out better than any of his solutions.

The problem isn’t the codes, per se, it’s the context. Improve the context, improve the outcome (which is also true for his alternative suggestions).